The Connection Between Hip Impingement and Labral Tears

Hip impingement and labral tears have one big thing in common: They both hurt! But there’s more to the similarities of these conditions than meets the eye. If you’ve experienced hip impingement – abnormal growth in the ball and socket of your hip joints – you could also be at risk for labral tears. 

 Doctor Joshua Harris, located in Houston, Texas, can help diagnose your hip pain and recommend a treatment plan.  

How to know if you have a subspine hip impingement

Subspine impingement is one of several different types of hip impingement. If you’ve experienced a recent injury and have suffered hip pain, you may have inflammation in the joint lining and limited mobility. Even injuries in bone structures that are not part of the hip joint can cause impingements. There are at least three different types of subspine impingement:

Type I

When there is hip pain, but no bone damage between the subspine or hip socket rim.

Type II

When the bone ends up extended from the lower part of the subspine to the rim of the hip socket.

Type III

When the subspine resembles spurs and is extended far below the hip socket rim.

If your hip injury results in any of these injuries, Dr. Harris should evaluate you to lower the chance of further damage.

How to know if you have a hip labral tear

Similar to hip impingements, a labral tear is also an injury to the hip socket. Hip tears can also be caused by injuries, and the symptoms are similar: stiffness in the hip joint, pain in the groin area, and difficulties with mobility.

How hip labral tears and hip impingements are treated

Labral tears and impingements can be diagnosed with X-rays or an MRI. Dr. Harris may ask you if you’ve experienced difficulties moving around, as well as have you move your legs or walk. 

Describing the pain you feel as specifically as possible can help with the diagnosis. Hip tears or hip impingements can be treated nonsurgically, such as with pain medication or physical therapy. More serious tearing may require surgery, depending on the severity of the injury. The recovery time may involve the use of crutches or a wheelchair and can take up to four to six months.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Harris

If your hip injury isn’t getting any better, Dr. Harris and his staff can help you develop an appropriate treatment plan. You can reach him by calling 713-244-6395, or book an appointment online. We look forward to hearing from you.

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