Joshua Harris M.D
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Hip

Normal Anatomy of the Hip joint

The thigh bone, femur, and the pelvis, acetabulum, join to form the hip joint. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

The cartilage cushions the joint and allows the bones to move on each other with smooth movements. This cartilage does not show up on X-ray, therefore you can see a “joint space” between the femoral head and acetabular socket.

Pelvis

The pelvis is a large, flattened, irregularly shaped bone, constricted in the center and expanded above and below. It consists of three parts: the ilium, ischium, and pubis.

The socket, acetabulum, is situated on the outer surface of the bone and joins to the head of the femur to form the hip joint.

Femur

The femur is the longest bone in the skeleton. It joins to the pelvis, acetabulum, to form the hip joint.

How does the Hip joint work?

Find out more in this web based movie.

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is an excellent surgery that has helped many patients restore their hip function and experience decreased pain originating from their hip. Hip arthroscopy, is a minimally invasive surgery that is performed through very small incisions to evaluate and treat a variety of painful hip conditions. Your doctor performs the hip arthroscopy surgery through the 2-3 small incisions made near your hip joint. One incision is used for inserting an arthroscope and the other incisions are used for inserting instruments to repair the damaged structures. An arthroscope is a pencil-sized instrument that has a small lens and lighting system at its one end. The arthroscope magnifies and illuminates the structures inside the body with the light that is transmitted through fiber optics. It is attached to a television camera and the internal structures are seen on the television monitor.

Find out more about Hip Arthroscopy with the following link

Gluteus Medius Tear

Gluteus medius is one of 3 muscles in the buttocks and is situated on the outer surface of the hip. The function of the gluteus medius is to assist with pelvis stability, hip abduction, along with internal and external rotation of the hip. Tears of the gluteus medius usually occur where the tendon inserts at the greater trochanter, causing lateral hip pain.

Find out more about Gluteus with the following link.

Hip Preservation Surgery

The hip joint is one of the body’s largest weight-bearing joints and is the point where the thigh bone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum) join. It is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular cartilage that cushions and enables smooth movements of the joint.

Find out more about Hip Preservation Surgery with the following link.

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), often referred to as hip impingement is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each other creating damage and pain to the hip joint. The damage can occur to the articular cartilage (the smooth white surface of the ball or socket) or the labral tissue (the lining of the edge of the socket) during normal movement of the hip. The articular cartilage or labral tissue can fray or tear after repeated friction. Over time, more cartilage and labrum is lost until eventually the femur bone and acetabulum bone impact on one other. Bone on bone friction is commonly referred to as Osteoarthritis.

Find out more about Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) with the following link.

Revision Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat a variety of hip conditions. The indications for hip arthroscopy have been on the rise over the past several years. With the increase in the number of surgeries performed annually, there has been an increase in the number of unsuccessful procedures and the number of revision surgeries.

Find out more about Revision Hip Arthroscopy with the following link.

Labral Tear

Labrum is a ring of strong fibrocartilaginous tissue lining around the socket of the hip joint. Labrum serves many functions where it acts as shock absorber, lubricates the joint, and distributes the pressure equally. It holds the head of the femur in place and prevents the lateral and vertical movement of the femur head with in the joint. It also deepens the acetabular cavity and offers stability against femoral head translation.

Find out more about Labral Tear with the following link.

Snapping Hip

The hip is an important joint that helps us walk, run and jump. The ball-and-socket joint in the hip is formed between the round end of the femur (thighbone) and the cup-shaped socket of the acetabulum (part of the hip bone). Joint stability in the hip region is achieved through the labrum (a strong fibrous cartilage), which covers the acetabulum and seals it, and ligaments (tissue connecting bone to bone) and tendons (tissue connecting muscle to bone) that encase the hip and control the hip movements.

Find out more about Snapping Hip with the following link.

Proximal Hamstring Tears

Hamstring injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports activities such as track, soccer, and basketball that involve running. The three hamstring muscles namely semitendinosus, semimembranosus and biceps femoris are at the back of the thigh and helps you bend (flex) your knee and extend your leg.

Find out more about Knee Joint Preservation with the following link.

Subspine Impingement

The subspine or anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) is a bony process located on the wing of the ilium (upper, large, flat and cup-shaped bone of the hip bone). It lies deep under the soft tissues where the ilium slopes towards the hip joint.

Find out more about Subspine Impingement with the following link.

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